Heals on Wheels: Pandemic takes Central City's Brewco into building mobile medical units | Features | messenger-inquirer.com

2022-06-15 11:16:53 By : Mr. Jennifer Chen

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An EMS team works to assemble the Owensboro Health Muhlenberg Community Hospital and Muhlenberg County Health Department Mobile Medical Trailer for the Rural Health Clinic at the Muhlenberg County Senior Center Health Fair last week. The trailer was fabricated by Brewco Marketing Company in January for community health purposes.

The 29-foot mobile medical unit for Owensboro Health Muhlenberg Community Hospital and the Muhlenberg County Health Department was constructed for $126,360 by Brewco.

An EMS team works to assemble the Owensboro Health Muhlenberg Community Hospital and Muhlenberg County Health Department Mobile Medical Trailer for the Rural Health Clinic at the Muhlenberg County Senior Center Health Fair last week. The trailer was fabricated by Brewco Marketing Company in January for community health purposes.

The 29-foot mobile medical unit for Owensboro Health Muhlenberg Community Hospital and the Muhlenberg County Health Department was constructed for $126,360 by Brewco.

Brewco Marketing Group, based out of Central City, has gone from building race cars to now fabricating mobile medical units.

Over the course of 25 years, the company has adapted itself and the pandemic proved to be another transitioning point to filling a nationwide need in health care.

Caitlin Adams, Brewco Marketing Group's director of public relations, said the company is working to impact the health care of communities nationwide by providing mobile medical trailers to health care systems.

It also continues to provide mobile marketing for companies nationwide such as McDonald’s and works with other businesses in a similar capacity for product sampling.

That part of the business includes trailers for staging, retail pop-ups, mobile training, mobile offices and mobile command centers and has a presence at many major events throughout the country, from music festivals to the Super Bowl.

“We’ve worked with a lot of great companies to bring experiences on the road for them and so it was a natural segue to also do mobile medical,” Adams said.

Originally founded as Brewco Motorsports in the late 1990s and early 2000s, Brewco Motorsports was a racing team that competed in the NASCAR Busch Series, winning 10 races throughout 13 seasons in the Busch Series, and entered a single NASCAR Nextel Cup Series race in 2004.

The marketing part of the business grew out of a need to gain more name recognition for the team, though eventually, it would transition into the Brewco Marketing Group with a focus on providing marketing and trailer needs for its clients.

The recent transition to providing medical trailers, Adams said, came as a result of COVID-19 as the company recognized the need for expanded medical services and the need for health care entities to become more accessible to their communities, especially rural ones.

"When the pandemic happened, and the experiential marketing industry came to a standstill, we knew we had to drastically pivot," said Brewco Marketing Group President Shane Kennedy. "As a result, we found medical opportunities, established Brewco Health, and utilized our team’s capabilities to deliver mobile health solutions when communities needed them the most."

Mobile medical trailers, according to Adams, not only allow health care systems to bring its services to patients, but it also better enables health care entities to respond on-site to medical emergencies brought on by disasters, provide on-site screenings and testing, and even expand inpatient capacities and intensive care unit bed space, if necessary.

“Brewco Marketing Group is proud to have an impact on community health through our Brewco Health projects, both near and far," Kennedy said. "It is a comfort to know that our recent work is helping the communities we call home ... We continue to seek out mobile medical opportunities. It’s incredible to see the relief that a mobile unit can provide to a medical system that is experiencing challenges."

The company first got involved with providing mobile medical trailers in 2019, right before the pandemic hit, she said, fabricating a mobile training unit for a new glucose monitoring system.

Once the pandemic hit, she said the company realized it could utilize what it was doing to help further impact the health care field by allowing health care entities to become mobile and take services where they were needed the most.

The first pandemic-related project Brewco Health undertook was in Arizona.

“One of the first projects we did during the pandemic era was for the Tohono O’odham Nation,” she said. “Basically the Indian Nations were having issues because their hospital infrastructures couldn’t keep up with COVID needs.”

The on-site hospital located within the nation, she said, was a small 14-bed facility that did not have capacity to care for as many patients as it needed to.

The mobile medical trailer, she said, provided what was essentially a mobile emergency room equipped with a mobile lab with diagnostic units, private bed space and a workstation for health care staff, providing a support unit to the already existing hospital.

The second project, Adams said, was a ten-bed mobile unit for Gila River Healthcare, another Native American community located in Arizona, providing a 40% increase in the health care entity’s inpatient capacity.

The next, she said, was the largest-scale project Brewco Health has taken on thus far, which included four 53-foot mobile intensive care units for Texas Division for Emergency Management.

The trailers, she said, can be deployed separately in times of disaster, such as a tornado or intense storms, or they can be used all together to form one single field hospital.

Following that project, she said the company then built a mobile medical trailer for the Owensboro Health Muhlenberg Community Hospital and the Muhlenberg County Health Department for $126,360, which is a 29-foot trailer meant to help serve the community in a variety of capacities.

“That’s purely for community health purposes in making sure rural health care is accessible,” she said.

According to OHMCH, the 200-square-foot unit contains two patient screening rooms, a registration room and a work area for health care staff, complete with a negative air pressure system.

It is intended to provide on-site first aid at community events or during disaster relief effort, health screenings and assessments, as well as for COVID-19 testing and vaccination efforts.

Recently, the trailer was used to provide an on-site coal miner’s respiratory clinic.

The transition to provide medical needs to rural health care entities, Adams said, helps increase access to health care needs by underserved populations or communities in crisis.

“It was the perfect opportunity to expand into medical when the country was going through such a great need for expanded medical services due to the pandemic,” she said. “It’s exciting to be able to impact communities where they need it the most and mobile testing is such a big thing right now with COVID … There’s a lot of preventative health care that can happen when a health care entity takes on a mobile medical unit.”

Christie Netherton, cnetherton@messenger-inquirer.com, 270-691-7360

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